Super Bowl LI on Facebook and Instagram

Fans turned to Facebook and Instagram during Super Bowl LI as the Patriots beat the Falcons 34–28 in overtime at NRG Stadium in Houston, Texas. Worldwide, 64 million people joined the conversation on Facebookenough to fill the stadium almost 900 times over. 44 million joined the conversation on Instagram.

People discussed everything from New England’s incredible comeback to Lady Gaga’s halftime show to Audi’s “Daughter” ad. All in all, Facebook recorded 240 million interactions and Instagram saw 150 million interactions.1
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What Mends a Broken Heart on Facebook

So many moments of a modern romance are lived online, captured in posted photos, videos and check-ins for all our friends and family to see.

But what happens when a public relationship turns into a private break up?

We wanted to know more about what it means for people to end a relationship in the digital age. As part of our Moments That Matter series, Facebook IQ explored how the break-up moment influenced the online behaviors of people across France, the Netherlands, Poland, the United Arab Emirates and the United Kingdom who indicated on Facebook that they recently went through a break up.* We also surveyed people across the five markets to learn more about what helped them through a recent break up.* Read more

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Winning hearts on Valentine’s Day

During the first big consumer holiday of the year, people spend billions showing affection for loved ones.1  They come to Facebook and Instagram to connect over happiness and heartbreak and share in the moment with loved ones of all kinds. We took a look at how conversations played out on our platforms surrounding Valentine’s Day 2016.  Read more

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Awards Night on Facebook and Instagram

During the biggest night in entertainment, the party is on Facebook and Instagram. We took a look at how conversations played out on our platforms surrounding the 2016 show.

During the 88th Academy Awards®, 24 million people worldwide generated 67 million event-related posts, likes and comments on Facebook.1 And on Instagram, 19 million people worldwide generated 64 million event-related interactions.1

So it’s no surprise that surrounding this cultural moment, the winner is … mobile. In 2016, the conversation was bigger than ever on Facebook and Instagram, growing 15% globally year over year.1 And the vast majority of related posts, videos and photos (89% in the US and 78% in Canada) were shared on mobile. Read more

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Weddings: From Hashtags to Honeymoons

With wedding season in full swing, many couples across the globe are putting the finishing touches on their plans for the big day. After all the months of anticipation, couples will be feeling the intoxicating mix of happiness and excitement as they prepare to take their vows and embark on the greatest adventure of their lives together—marriage. Read more

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Marketing to Moments That Matter

Every day, everywhere, people are connecting around millions of moments that matter to them—from wedding announcements to birth announcements, from birthdays to beach days and from training for a marathon to watching a TV marathon.

Over the past several months, Facebook IQ has examined insights around these moments that people share—and share in—on Facebook and Instagram every day.

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Moments That Matter: Cooking Up Connections

Food and everything that goes with it—the cooking, the baking, the dining—is always best when shared with others. And now people are extending that experience online, inviting their friends into every facet of the process, from the prep to the plating to the piece de resistance.

With over 75% of people in the US reporting eating dinner at home,1 cooking and baking remains an everyday moment in peoples’ lives. In 2013, the average American family spent $4,000 on groceries, or about $330 per month, making food at home the fourth biggest budget priority behind housing, transportation, personal insurance and pensions.2

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Moments That Matter: Losing Your Phone, Finding Your Friends

Many of us consider our mobile phone to be our lifeline to the world. Home to essential apps, appointments, messages, music, names, numbers and notes, our mobile devices connect us to the people and things that matter most to us.

At some point, many of us will be faced with the challenge of losing our phone. But that moment of misfortune also has the potential to be wonderful—a chance for people to remember that they are cared for, that help is always close at hand and that life can be surprising and delightful.

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Moments That Matter: Moving In, Moving Out

For some, moving conjures logistical challenges. For others, moving presents opportunities. It is a moment to build new routines, try new things and make new friends. It is a moment to think about where you came from and consider where you are going. It is a moment to explore.

In a study of people on Facebook moving within the United States, we learned that people who move are more open to doing new things as they learn about their new surroundings. We also learned that people go on Facebook when they move to stay connected to their former communities and connect with their new ones, talking about everything from bubble wrap and packing to their new address and renovations. In this way, Facebook now serves as people’s change of address card.

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Moments That Matter: Finding the Extraordinary in the Ordinary

We are marketers participating in arguably the most important medium shift in marketing since the first television ad for Bulova watches in 1941. Mobile has delivered us from a mass media world to a personally relevant one—from a world in which marketers would buy TV, magazine and radio ads as a way to reach people based purely on context to a world in which marketers can reach individuals based not just on demographics but also on passions, behaviors, interests and so on. It’s driven the shift from a world of appointment-driven media ruled by rigid 15-, 30- and 60-second frameworks to a world of anytime/anywhere media.

And thanks to mobile, we’re moving from fewer bigger, longer moments manufactured by the media and marketing industry—moments like soap operas, the “Seinfeld” finale and pivotal sports games—to a time when people are manufacturing and consuming their own and each other’s moments en masse—every minute, every day, 365 days a year. From meals to memes, from first steps to first jobs and from moving on to moving up, millions of people go on Facebook and Instagram to share—and share in—these types of moments every day.

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